Cornwall

R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#61
We need your views and voices.... Please attend

:clap: :hi:

This is an invite to all who have an interest in Mental Health Services in Cornwall, no matter if you are a Service User, Carer, Therapist, Consellor or a Cornwall / Parish Councilor, Press or Media personal, ALL Health Workers, All Charities, in fact if you live or work in Cornwall, then you need to put this date into your diary.


THURSDAY 25th NOVEMBER 2010. 11.00AM TO 2.00PM



Big changes have been going on in Cornwall, without service user consultation. This is of course in contravention of Section 242 (1B) of the NHS Act 2006, which came into force on 3rd November 2008. This act brought all other previous acts under one heading.



One of the things wrong in Cornwall was the dismise of the Mental Health Service Users Forums. The successful Forums were taken away from The Service Users and became just another management tool. There was a large void that appeared and without any consultation the Forums turned into Cornwall mental health Project.



There has been many meeting since then, but our consultations with all sections of Health and Social Care had diminished. A few NHS managers still involved Service Users, but many have contravened the act whilst the Forums haven't been operating.



Well that is now all in the past and on Thursday 25th November, it is hoped to lay down the first steps of re-establishing The Forums throughout ALL of Cornwall. So that every person who has a mental or emotional condition / illness will be able to meet with other sufferers, sharing stories, support, advocating, so helping each other to band together in making sure the services are there when they are needed.


From The Forums, representatives will be able to share your concerns with those who make the decisions, also we hope to resume with the input from professionals to keep us in the picture of their thoughts about services, before they impose things that often do not work for the client.


So you have the date and time, now where is it?


TRURO TOWN HALL............. Refreshments provided.


There will be a presentation, followed by a Question Time or a Round Table Debate and then a casual get together. So it will all be rather laid back, come along enjoy.

For Service Users living in Cornwall and you need transport, please call Jane on 01872-243532 please also call Jane for other information and if you need directions.



If you are a Mental Health professional or a charity and you would like to have a display information, then once again then please contact Jane.



I am in respite at Oakleigh (of course just one of the things The Forums achieved) this week...... but feel free to email me on any issue you would like to see at the Open Meeting on 25th November.



Hope to see you there..... please tell everyone you know... we don't always know who is suffering.



Regards



Ray :flower2::loveshower::thx:

www.suncornwall.com
 
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#62
[B]DON'T FORGET THIS THURSDAY 25TH NOVEMBER 2010 [/B]Calling all Service Users, Carers, Health Professionals, politicians in fact anyone who has an interest about mental health in Cornwall. It is hoped to re-start the Mental Health Forums. To kick this off, a open public meeting is taking place this Thursday 25th Novemeber 2010 at 11:00am until 2:00pm, the venue is Truro City Hall.

The programme being.... a Service User Presentation followed by an "Any Questions" on the panel will be Senior Mental Health Managers, Commisioner for Mental Health Services, a G.P. and hopefully a Senior Politician, along with four Service User Representatives. The Chairperson will be a Service User :). Then there will be a FREE refreshemnt break, followed by a from the floor "Question Time".

More information can be had on www.SunCornwall.com ....... Service users can claim for travel or if you have any transport issues, then please ring Jane on 01872-243532
 
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#63
Everything went off well, around 100 turned up. It was the day when snow blocked in people of South East Cornwall and North Cornwall, so I think we could of had another 50 or so who couldn't make it. Also I had 3... so do not know how many others, said they could not find the venue.

I gave the service user presentation.... can be seen at www.mhforums.com . This is the agreed way forward at The Service User Representative Group (SURG).

Afterwards the "Any Questions" session included the Chief Executive of Cornwall Foundation Trust (CFT), a new Manager of CFT, who up to recently was the Commissioner for services with The Primary Care Trust (PCT). A GP from a local practice, a Nurse and A Social Worker.

Lots of good questions were asked from SURG and the audience. Though we had around nearly two hours of questions.... the time soon ran out. Had to leave out over thirty questions.

This was the first of the new Forums, but it won't be the last.

Well done for all those who came along, I believe we showed just how much Service users are willing to be involved with their own care and are willing to work together for a better service.

Local Forums will be run out starting in the Spring. I look forward to meeting up with many of you.
 
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#64


Hope you have a peaceful and happy Christmas Season. We did well in 2010 and are now on the brink of re-establishing Mental Health Forums in every area in Cornwall during the coming spring.



If you would like to get involved, only as much as you so wish... then please get in touch.



By this time next year I do hope to be able to report the Forums as being up and running and being very effective in developing services for all that need them.





Regards





Ray



http://www.suncornwall.com/
 
smileyfi

smileyfi

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
11
#65
Family in wadebrige, cornwall. I go there 1 or 2 times a year. It's very stressful. Would like to find support when down there. Any ideas? Thank you.
 
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#66
Family in wadebrige, cornwall. I go there 1 or 2 times a year. It's very stressful. Would like to find support when down there. Any ideas? Thank you.
Sorry not got back to you before ..... Not alot in Wadebridge..... RETHINK has an office on the road past the library, I think its called The Shed, I know I did some training with SEAP sometime ago there.

Nearest NHS Day resource Centre would be Bude, Launceston or Bodmin.... if you want more information, please make contact.... the website is usually the best way, which is Home - Emotional & Mental Health - SUN Cornwall

i will also try to see what else there is about for you..... How long do you come down for and when?

Regards

Ray
 
R

Riya_lib12

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2013
Messages
4
#67
Hi- I am also looking for mental health resources in Cornwall; specifically, I am trying to find out if Outlook Southwest will see ppl with BPD. There is nothing to indicate whether they do or don't on their site, but can anybody let me know before I contact them? The reason for this caution is that i tried to get help from BeMe recently and they rejected me on that basis, recommending CMHT, but I have had very negative and unproductive/unhelpful experiences with them before, so they really are not an option.
 
A

Avalanche

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2015
Messages
4
#68
Wow, if i'd have seen this years ago I definitely would have got involved. I got treated terribly years ago by CMHT and it made me ten times worse. I've been on at my CPN for years about a crisis house for people with BPD. I used to have that diagnosis but it's now DID. Any progress made? The CMHT have improved alot, maybe i only think that because i was changed to a great CPN and now see and private psychiatrist..
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,146
#69
Hiya

just wanted to stick my nose in and say I have my dad's fambly tree right back to 1600

All in Cornwall

We even have a town named after us...or us after the town maybe...:)

Then they all got up and went to the New World

Brave!!!! And I share their staunchness and ability to survive quite well in black holes with no light no air and dying canaries all about
 
R

Riya_lib12

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2013
Messages
4
#70
Hi Avalanche

Actually, 2 months ago I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, so all these years, it appears I've been living with a false diagnosis and so unsurprisingly have not responded to the kinds of therapies aimed at BPD (such as they are). I currently have been offered a very short course of sessions with outlook, but they said that they'd had to devise a more specialist service for Asperger's sufferers because previously, after diagnosis people were being referred to CMHT and getting absolutely nowhere with them as CMHT does not understand/deal with Asperger's people very well. No surprise there.

Basically,I would avoid CMHT and pretty much all the NHS primary 'care' services for mental health as they're just a bog-standard, under-funded (dis)organisation that are just not equipped to handle the vast array of different conditions that people will present with and have long since lost the ability to care about or respect the people seeking their help (if they ever had that ability at all...)

The NHS misdiagnosed me with BPD, robbing me of years of life and causing years of unnecessary suffering. It sounds like they did the same to you too. I can understand someone making a mistake- not having the expertise to see a person's symptoms for what they are- but with the BPD diagnosis, I feel there's something a bit more sinister going on. I think that these NHS psychologists label people with BPD because it's quite easy to make a wide variety of people/conditions 'fit' the diagnosis, but after it has been made, they know full well that the type of therapy which apparently helps BPD (DBT) is not offered on the NHS and that even those correctly diagnosed with BPD will struggle, make no progress and eventually drop out on the sub-standard therapy they do provide. It all comes down to a big cost/effort saving exercise and it's unbelievable cynical, but having been there, I know it to be true.

I haven't been able to find/maintain work for many years now, which means I can't pay for good, effective, private therapy. Ideally, I should be getting myself well enough to cope in work, instead, I need to get into work so that I can then pay for the therapy to get myself well enough to cope in work. You have to do C to get to B. It's an unacceptable way to treat vulnerable people, but that's what you have to do when the system isn't there for you.

Since getting the correct diagnosis however, 'dealing' with 'things' seems a bit more doable. Being on the same page as your therapist; recognising yourself in the literature on the subject instead of trying to retro-fit BPD symptoms onto yourself and thinking all along, '...not really..' I hope you're having more success in getting treated for DID. I don't know how widespread therapy and other support for that is, but hopefully, if you have the right diagnosis now, you're feeling more understood.

I'm not actually sure what I think of BPD anymore. I think it's very easy for feeble NHS psychologists to slap that diagnosis on people and brush them under the rug, knowing that they can always blame the patient for not responding to 'treatment' instead of questioning whether the treatment or diagnosis is at fault. I think that happens to a lot of people and I'm not sure whether there really is a core of 'true' BPD sufferers who are also not responding to treatment, because the type of treatment offered is inadequate. BPD is beginning to be viewed by some as a form of PTSD, but it is not treated in the same way + sufferers are repeatedly abused and re-traumatised by so-called therapists telling them that their distress is due to their perception being 'wrong', rather than their having been traumatised by distressing experiences.

NHS psychologists need to start looking at the individual, treating people with care, concern and respect- giving patients as many appointments as they need as often as they need them! -treating the symptoms rather than hiding behind a diagnostic label, as if that amounts to understanding! We need proper funding for decent mental health services. Until then, I'm inclined to avoid most of them like the plague because they'll only make you worse :/
 
A

Avalanche

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2015
Messages
4
#71
Hi Avalanche

Actually, 2 months ago I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, so all these years, it appears I've been living with a false diagnosis and so unsurprisingly have not responded to the kinds of therapies aimed at BPD (such as they are). I currently have been offered a very short course of sessions with outlook, but they said that they'd had to devise a more specialist service for Asperger's sufferers because previously, after diagnosis people were being referred to CMHT and getting absolutely nowhere with them as CMHT does not understand/deal with Asperger's people very well. No surprise there.

Basically,I would avoid CMHT and pretty much all the NHS primary 'care' services for mental health as they're just a bog-standard, under-funded (dis)organisation that are just not equipped to handle the vast array of different conditions that people will present with and have long since lost the ability to care about or respect the people seeking their help (if they ever had that ability at all...)

The NHS misdiagnosed me with BPD, robbing me of years of life and causing years of unnecessary suffering. It sounds like they did the same to you too. I can understand someone making a mistake- not having the expertise to see a person's symptoms for what they are- but with the BPD diagnosis, I feel there's something a bit more sinister going on. I think that these NHS psychologists label people with BPD because it's quite easy to make a wide variety of people/conditions 'fit' the diagnosis, but after it has been made, they know full well that the type of therapy which apparently helps BPD (DBT) is not offered on the NHS and that even those correctly diagnosed with BPD will struggle, make no progress and eventually drop out on the sub-standard therapy they do provide. It all comes down to a big cost/effort saving exercise and it's unbelievable cynical, but having been there, I know it to be true.

I haven't been able to find/maintain work for many years now, which means I can't pay for good, effective, private therapy. Ideally, I should be getting myself well enough to cope in work, instead, I need to get into work so that I can then pay for the therapy to get myself well enough to cope in work. You have to do C to get to B. It's an unacceptable way to treat vulnerable people, but that's what you have to do when the system isn't there for you.

Since getting the correct diagnosis however, 'dealing' with 'things' seems a bit more doable. Being on the same page as your therapist; recognising yourself in the literature on the subject instead of trying to retro-fit BPD symptoms onto yourself and thinking all along, '...not really..' I hope you're having more success in getting treated for DID. I don't know how widespread therapy and other support for that is, but hopefully, if you have the right diagnosis now, you're feeling more understood.

I'm not actually sure what I think of BPD anymore. I think it's very easy for feeble NHS psychologists to slap that diagnosis on people and brush them under the rug, knowing that they can always blame the patient for not responding to 'treatment' instead of questioning whether the treatment or diagnosis is at fault. I think that happens to a lot of people and I'm not sure whether there really is a core of 'true' BPD sufferers who are also not responding to treatment, because the type of treatment offered is inadequate. BPD is beginning to be viewed by some as a form of PTSD, but it is not treated in the same way + sufferers are repeatedly abused and re-traumatised by so-called therapists telling them that their distress is due to their perception being 'wrong', rather than their having been traumatised by distressing experiences.

NHS psychologists need to start looking at the individual, treating people with care, concern and respect- giving patients as many appointments as they need as often as they need them! -treating the symptoms rather than hiding behind a diagnostic label, as if that amounts to understanding! We need proper funding for decent mental health services. Until then, I'm inclined to avoid most of them like the plague because they'll only make you worse :/
I completely agree with you. BPD is a very damaging diagnosis. It seems to be given to the majority of people because they don't know what is wrong with them. For years BPD was deemed untreatable. This was fine for the NHS as they could give a few therapy sessions then discharge patients, leaving them vunerable and many left to take their lives. When i was diagnosed, i had attempted my life three times in one day resulting in the police having to force the mental hospital to see me as the CMHT insisted I was fine. Even then the hospital refused to take me on grounds of my diagnosis. (BPD was considered a pain in 2009). Through the years I was told that even though i was a high risk, DBT was unavailable to me as there were ten spaces for the treatment in the whole of Cornwall. Now i know they were wrong, why they didnt put two and two together is beyond me. When I finally realised what was really happening to me, my CPN even tried claiming that people with BPD have split personalities and that it was nothing. Going private was the best thing i ever did as the CMHT had to listen. It's a shame its so expensive, i pay for it out of my DLA luckily.
I cant believe they branded you with BPD when you have aspergers! How wrong can people be. Must have been a horrible experience for you so i'm really glad you have finally got a correct diagnosis.
I think that what the NHS lack, in terms of mental health services, are doctors with experience in mental health. It's easy to get a qualification but they lack basic intuition that comes with years of strife and it seems their understanding is borrowed from reading books.
I've found the best professionals are ones who have had mental health difficulties and have overcome it enough to help others.
I can admit that CHMT are improving greatly but there is so much more they can do. Shame there is such a lack of funding for them
 
R

Riya_lib12

New member
Joined
Oct 15, 2013
Messages
4
#72
OMG! I can't belive you were pushed into such a state that you had 3 attemps in one day! No-one should be allowed to get into that state. Isn't it amazing how organisations outside of the mental health service, such as employment support and the police will look at you in disbelief and say, '..this person really needs help..' or tell you, '..you need to go to your GP...you need to do this..you need to do that...' and if/when you do go to the doctor or try, like I did, to get a voluntary mental health assessment from CMHT, all they want to do is downplay, belittle and dissmiss what you tell them. Totally different standard to the rest of the world really. Also, it's so frustrating when you've tried everything available, every service or therapist/type of therapy you can access or afford to no avail- or usually worse and then some dickhead who knows very little about you, who hasn't experienced the receiving end of the mental health service for themselves, thinks they know enough to tell you that you should go back to them and then you have to somehow find the patience to explain to them that it doesnt work, that the GP isnt motivated to get you well, that the NHS doesnt have the range of expertise or suitabke therapies available to help every condition and that the wrong approach makes it worse. All the time you're tryring to explain to these people, you know they're not really taking your side of it in, because being tarred with the mental health brush, your point of view is of course unreliable and because they think the system works and is there for everybody, when it so isnt -what makes it worse is that you're trying to bring sombody up to speed when you're vulnerable and really need care and encouragment, not scepticism and scrutiny. The system is broken and most people don't find that out unless they are unwell and in need of help.
It sounds really mean, butwe really do need alot more doctors, employment advisors and NHS psychologists to get sick, to walk in our shoes, to come to know what it's like to live as a vulnerable person and to realise they gap between secondary and primary care services -i.e. where secondary care services judge you as too mental for them to deal with, but the primary services don't pay you much attention if you're not displaying key delusional or violent (either inward or outward) behaviour. I wish they could experience what it's like for a few weeks and then come back and see if they're gonna tell me to go back to the GP -as if i haven't been doing just that for the last 18 years. :/
 
BorderlineDownunder

BorderlineDownunder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
17,146
#73
Hi Avalanche

Actually, 2 months ago I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, so all these years, it appears I've been living with a false diagnosis and so unsurprisingly have not responded to the kinds of therapies aimed at BPD (such as they are). I currently have been offered a very short course of sessions with outlook, but they said that they'd had to devise a more specialist service for Asperger's sufferers because previously, after diagnosis people were being referred to CMHT and getting absolutely nowhere with them as CMHT does not understand/deal with Asperger's people very well. No surprise there.

Basically,I would avoid CMHT and pretty much all the NHS primary 'care' services for mental health as they're just a bog-standard, under-funded (dis)organisation that are just not equipped to handle the vast array of different conditions that people will present with and have long since lost the ability to care about or respect the people seeking their help (if they ever had that ability at all...)

The NHS misdiagnosed me with BPD, robbing me of years of life and causing years of unnecessary suffering. It sounds like they did the same to you too. I can understand someone making a mistake- not having the expertise to see a person's symptoms for what they are- but with the BPD diagnosis, I feel there's something a bit more sinister going on. I think that these NHS psychologists label people with BPD because it's quite easy to make a wide variety of people/conditions 'fit' the diagnosis, but after it has been made, they know full well that the type of therapy which apparently helps BPD (DBT) is not offered on the NHS and that even those correctly diagnosed with BPD will struggle, make no progress and eventually drop out on the sub-standard therapy they do provide. It all comes down to a big cost/effort saving exercise and it's unbelievable cynical, but having been there, I know it to be true.

I haven't been able to find/maintain work for many years now, which means I can't pay for good, effective, private therapy. Ideally, I should be getting myself well enough to cope in work, instead, I need to get into work so that I can then pay for the therapy to get myself well enough to cope in work. You have to do C to get to B. It's an unacceptable way to treat vulnerable people, but that's what you have to do when the system isn't there for you.

Since getting the correct diagnosis however, 'dealing' with 'things' seems a bit more doable. Being on the same page as your therapist; recognising yourself in the literature on the subject instead of trying to retro-fit BPD symptoms onto yourself and thinking all along, '...not really..' I hope you're having more success in getting treated for DID. I don't know how widespread therapy and other support for that is, but hopefully, if you have the right diagnosis now, you're feeling more understood.

I'm not actually sure what I think of BPD anymore. I think it's very easy for feeble NHS psychologists to slap that diagnosis on people and brush them under the rug, knowing that they can always blame the patient for not responding to 'treatment' instead of questioning whether the treatment or diagnosis is at fault. I think that happens to a lot of people and I'm not sure whether there really is a core of 'true' BPD sufferers who are also not responding to treatment, because the type of treatment offered is inadequate. BPD is beginning to be viewed by some as a form of PTSD, but it is not treated in the same way + sufferers are repeatedly abused and re-traumatised by so-called therapists telling them that their distress is due to their perception being 'wrong', rather than their having been traumatised by distressing experiences.

NHS psychologists need to start looking at the individual, treating people with care, concern and respect- giving patients as many appointments as they need as often as they need them! -treating the symptoms rather than hiding behind a diagnostic label, as if that amounts to understanding! We need proper funding for decent mental health services. Until then, I'm inclined to avoid most of them like the plague because they'll only make you worse :/
Just wanted to say I got the BPD label slapped on me at the ripe old age of 50

My current therapist who has proven 100% more trustworthy thinks I may have bipolar 2 instead

the first 3 thought I was just Depressed or smoked too much weed

lazy asshats...if id conducted my career the way these people conduct theirs I would've been fired years ago

Its criminal really when you realize how much power they have with their casual words and diagnoses in half an hour
 
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#74
Hello All, Sorry haven't been active for so long. Been really struggling for years. Though I am with a long term therapist, who is a specialist in child psychology and analytical therapy. it is hard work and very in depth, but I do believe we are working in the right direction. So here I am in my 69th year, with my first overdose aged 9. Being given just about every diagnoses over the years. But thing only started to change, once I took control of my condition. I wouldn't give up until I understood what was going on for me. I know most people shy away from the label of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) / Uncontrollable Emotions. But this has been the start of my recovery journey, this is what I needed fifty years ago.

So if you are finding it hard to be heard, to so research and debate with you team, tell then what you believe you need AND DON'T GIVE UP. If you have a diagnose of BPD, quote from the N.I.C.E. site, which says you are entitled to NHS treatment for as long as you require it. It also says talking therapies must be offered and can be long term. If you are told NO, contact NICE and your MP.

We can live with the condition, if we know what we are dealing with......... Take care

Home
 
U

unbALANced

New member
Joined
Apr 17, 2018
Messages
2
Location
Cornwall
#75
Are there any groups in north Cornwall that either support and/or need a volunteer?

I have been having a nightmare with icmht, well, particularly my appointed CPN, so much so they have discharged me and pointed me towards a specific counselling service, and told me my GP can look after me with frequent contact with psychologist.

I have positive diagnosis of rapid cycling bipolar with psychosis, and anxiety. GP believes but never had assessments for BPD and PTSD, although icmht have sent me for counselling because of the latter!?

Edit: Please note i've just signed up for the forum but am genuine, so please don't be put off replying.
 
Last edited:
R

RayJ

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
80
Location
Cornwall
#78
Well... welcome to all the new members... It's been a year ago since I last posted. Been really busy with Service User Network Cornwall & Plymouth. I don't know if I posted before about setting up a shop and Peer 2 Peer support in Portreath. That was on Mental Health Day 10th October 2017. We stayed there for a year, we have moved to Camborne and expanded. Not only do we have the shop selling self help books and adult activities, but now we have a meeting room adjoining. This is used for Arts & Crafts drop in, plus anyone want to set up support groups can ask to use the space.

I guess most of you heard they were closing Oakleigh House on 31st March.... Well SunCornwall wasn't having that and started a campaign along with Radio Cornwall's Laurence Reed, Sun member Paul Symons, Cornwall Councillors Jacquie Gammon, Colin Martin, Bert Biscoe, Loveday Jenkin, Pat Rogerson from The House of Lords Baroness Judith Jolly, the Liberal Democrats Health Spokesperson. I attended the Council meeting along with three other service users. The Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group (KCCG), who said this would happened, retracted right away, when they realised the fallout of their actions. The put the closure on hold for three months, whilst proper consultations could take place. This wasn't acceptable to Cornwall Councillors and a proposition was put forward, that the KCCG would return in three weeks with proper proposals along with a timeframe. This meeting did take place and the outcome was for funding to be put in place for a further three years. In the meantime, they would look at the evidence base of Oakleigh of the good it does for service users. The KCCG will report back in two years of their findings and say if they will continue funding after the three years are up.

Once again, it shows the need for service users to get involved, we also collected over 8,000 signatures in a matter of 3 to 4 weeks. Just about everyone who came in to Sun Cornwall store signed our petition. All of you who either signed or rang Radio Cornwall THANK YOU.... Well Done

Anyone who can get to Camborne and would like to volunteer in the shop or with arts & crafts, please make contact via the website www.suncornwall.com ... Well I will try to keep posting here on a more regular basis... but as you get older, you just get more and more busy.... I think it is you just try to cram everything in.... I passed my 70th birthday last August. I do want to keep the pressure up on services, until I'm at least 75.... but I could do with help along the way. We must get Emotional & Mental Health on par with physical health.

Oh! and by the way one of the clinical commissioning groups reason for trying to close Oakleigh, was because you have to have it in your care plan and to have a care plan you need a CPN. So if Oakleigh was out of the picture, then they could discharge more people. It does muck up their stats. and in the league tables CPN's aren't discharging enough people. Please us all informed of changes in your treatment and those who cannot get support let us know. I think it's time to collect a few stats of our own. Please also inform others you may know who needs support to join us either here or on suncornwall.com . We need to be ready if they start cutting the services even more.

Hope you are all enjoying the sun-shine. Take care xx